ICSE 2008 in Leipzig, Germany

30th International Conference on
Software Engineering ®
Leipzig, Germany, 10 - 18 May 2008

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Workshops

Saturday, 10 May 2008 Sunday, 11 May 2008 Monday, 12 May 2008 Tuesday, 13 May 2008 Saturday, 17 May 2008 Sunday, 18 May 2008
MSR 2008
Ballroom A 
SEAMS 2008
Ballroom B 
SESS 2008
Salon Wittenberg 
ULSSIS 2008
Salon Wittenberg 
PROMISE 2008
Ballroom C 
CVSM 2008
Salon Meissen 
 
MiSE 2008
Blauer Salon 
SDG 2008
Salon Mendelssohn 
BIPI 2008
Salon Potsdam 
   
APSO 2008
Salon Wagner 
AST 2008
Salon Schiller 
EA 2008
Salon Potsdam 
SHARK 2008
Salon Mendelssohn 
   
WoSQ 2008
Salon Potsdam 
IWMSE 2008
Salon Mendelssohn 
GraMoT 2008
Blauer Salon 
CHASE 2008
Ballroom A 
   
IWAAPF 2008
Boardroom 810+811 
LMSA 2008
Salon Wagner 
WEUSE IV
Ballroom A 
SECSE 2008
Boardroom 803 
   
SAM 2008
Salon Meissen 
ROA 2008
Salon Potsdam 
       
STC 2008
Salon Mendelssohn 
SDSOA 2008
Salon Meissen 
       
The Westin Leipzig
Workshop colors denote price groups.

Information about the Special Workshop Software Engineering in East and South Europe on this seperate page.

General Workshop Schedule

 09:00 - 10:30 

 First Session

 10:30 - 11:00 

 Coffee Break

 11:00 - 12:30 

 Second Session 

 12:30 - 14:00 

 Lunch 

 14:00 - 15:30 

 Third Session

 15:30 - 16:00 

 Coffeee Break 

 16:00 - 17:30 

 Fourth Session

 

MSR 2008
Fifth International Working Conference on Mining Software Repositories
Saturday, 10 May 2008 (full day), Ballroom A, The Westin Leipzig
and Sunday, 11 May 2008 (full day)
Organizers:
Michael W. Godfrey, University of Waterloo, Canada
Michele Lanza, University of Lugano, Switzerland
Sung Kim, MIT, USA

Software repositories such as source control systems, archived communications between project personnel, and defect tracking systems are used to help manage the progress of software projects. Software practitioners and researchers are recognizing the benefits of mining this information to support the maintenance of software systems, improve software design/reuse, and empirically validate novel ideas and techniques. Research is now proceeding to uncover the ways in which mining these repositories can help to understand software development, to support predictions about software development, and to exploit this knowledge concretely in planning future development. The goal of this two-day working conference is to strengthen the community of researchers and practitioners who are working to recover and use the data stored in software repositories to further understanding of software development practices. We expect the presentations and discussions at MSR 2008 in Leipzig to continue on a number of general themes and challenges from the previous workshops held at ICSE 07 in the US, ICSE 06 in China, ICSE 05 in the US, and ICSE 04 in Europe.

ULSSIS 2008
Second International Workshop on Ultra-Large-Scale Software-Intensive Systems
Saturday, 10 May 2008 (full day), Salon Wittenberg, The Westin Leipzig
and Sunday, 11 May 2008 (full day)
Organizers:
Rick Kazman, University of Hawaii and SEI/CMU, USA
Kevin Sullivan, University of Virginia, USA

The advent of Ultra-Large-Scale Software-Intensive Systems (ULSSIS) will pose fundamental new challenges in software and systems engineering. For example, the scale of ULS systems will be inconsistent with concepts of tight centralized control of system design at the heart of current theory and practice. The publication of a report, Ultra-Large-Scale Systems: The Software Challenge of the Future, by the Software Engineering Institute, has helped catalyze several major research initiatives around the world. ULSSIS 2008 will provide a venue for creating an international research community around this area.

MiSE 2008
Modeling in Software Engineering
Saturday, 10 May 2008 (half day (PM)), Blauer Salon, The Westin Leipzig
and Sunday, 11 May 2008 (full day)
Organizers:
Joanne Atlee, University of Waterloo, Canada
Robert France, Colorado State University, USA
Geri Georg, Colorado State University, USA
Ana Moreira, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal
Bernhard Rumpe, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany
Steven Völkel, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany
Steffen Zschaler, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany

This workshop aims to promote the use of models in the engineering of software systems. Models are an important tool in conquering the increasing complexity of modern software systems. There are currently two distinct communities in computer-science research, one focusing on modeling and one focusing on software engineering. An important goal of this workshop is to foster exchange between these two communities. The workshop is a continuation of a similar workshop last year, which served to align concepts and terminology between the two communities.

APSO 2008
Scrutinizing Agile Practices, or 'Shoot out at Process Corral'
Saturday, 10 May 2008 (full day), Salon Wagner, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Philippe Kruchten, University of British Columbia, Canada
Steve Adolph, WSA Consulting, Vancouver, Canada

Agile methods and practices are gaining momentum in industry, and also slowly making their way in academia. They bring fresh air, and funny new jargon. Some practitioners consider them as the ultimate advance in software engineering. But what do we know about this? Where is the evidence? Do they scale? Do they solve real issues or just substitute new issues to old ones? Are the benefits tangible, or just acts of faith? Aren't we all agile? Are they no agile failures? Isn't the "waterfall process" - that piñata of agilistas--the real holy grail of software engineering, and agile processes only a Band-Aid to compensate for our deficiencies? This workshop aims at challenging the ready-made ideas, the fluff, the hype, putting things into context, and examining these with fresh and open eyes.

WoSQ 2008
Sixth Workshop on Software Quality
Saturday, 10 May 2008 (full day), Salon Potsdam, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Bernard Wong, University of Technology Sydney, Australia,
Barry Boehm, University of Southern California Center for Software Engineering, USA
Sunita Chulani, IBM T.J. Watson Research Laboratory Center, San Jose, USA
June Verner, National Information Computing and Technology Australia, Australia

The Workshop on Software Quality aims at bringing together academic, industrial and commercial communities interested in software quality topics to discuss the different technologies being defined and used in the software quality area. The topics of interest in this discussion span the full range of software quality issues, including: Cross-Cultural Issues in Software Quality; Software Product Evaluation, Software Process Definition, Evaluation and Improvement; Certification; Education in Software Quality; Introduction of Software Quality Program; Methods and Tools for Quality Assurance; Metrics; Software Quality for Web Products; Software Quality for Object Oriented Products; Total Quality Management; Techniques for Quality Assurance; Testing; Inspections, Walkthroughs & Reviews; Combining Quality and Rapid Development; Managing a product portfolio. In order to foster discussion during the workshop, all participants will receive an electronic copy of accepted position papers in advance.

IWAAPF 2008
Third International Workshop on Advances and Applications of Problem Frames
Saturday, 10 May 2008 (full day), Boardroom 810+811, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Jon Hall, The Open University, UK
Lucia Rapanotti, The Open University, UK
Thein Than Tun, The Open University, UK

Michael Jackson's Problem Frames are a highly promising approach to early life-cycle software engineering. Their focus moves the engineer back to the problem to be solved rather than forward to the software and solving a poorly defined problem. The influence of the Problem Frames approach and related work is spreading in the fields of domain modelling, business process modelling, requirements engineering, software architecture as well as software engineering in general. The 3rd International Workshop on Advances and Applications of Problem Frames will continue the success of IWAAPF'04 and IWAAPF'06, held at ICSE'04 and ICSE'06, respectively. Both workshops were very successful: they attracted over 30 attendees each and had as major outcomes special issues (in Information and Software Technology, and Expert Systems, The Journal of Knowledge Engineering, respectively).

SAM 2008
First International Workshop on Software Architectures and Mobility
Saturday, 10 May 2008 (full day), Salon Meissen, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Rami Bahsoon, The University of Birmingham, UK
Licia Capra, University College London, UK,
Wolfgang Emmerich, University College London, UK
Mohammed E. Fayad, San José State University, USA

E-businesses are increasingly facing the need of porting the provision of their e-services to mobile customers. Evolving requirements, such as reliability, security, scalability, performance and privacy, from fixed to mobile settings, has revealed new and important challenges. This is due to the behavioural constraints that mobility poses, and that were not faced in traditional distributed settings. Examples include: dynamic network topology, changes in location, constrained resource availability, communication protocols heterogeneity, unstable connectivity, and so forth. Industrial practice is demonstrating that such transition is not straightforward and tends to be costly. In particular, the evolution may "break" the software system architecture, thus calling for substantial and expensive changes. Even when the system is (re)built from scratch, it is unclear if and how the state-of-the-art in software architectures relate to the requirements and concerns brought forward by mobile software systems. Likewise, there is still a lack of systematic software engineering methods and techniques which can assist in developing and evolving mobile software systems. The goal of this workshop is to address these gaps by strengthening the cross-fertilization of advances from requirements and domain engineering, software architectures, and middleware to systematically develop and evolve architectures supporting mobility.

STC 2008
Socio-Technical Congruence
Saturday, 10 May 2008 (full day), Salon Mendelssohn, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Marcelo Cataldo, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Daniela Damian, University of Victoria, Canada
Premkumar Devanbu, University of California, Davis, USA
Steve Easterbrook, University of Toronto, Canada
James Herbsleb, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Audris Mockus, Avaya Labs Research, USA

Conway claimed that products' structure resembles the structure of the organizations that designed them. Modular product structure has long remained the primary tactic for managing technical dependencies in software. Today, project coordination is increasingly difficult because of factors such as global distribution of projects, and increasing scale.

We need new and more effective approaches to technical coordination. One of the most promising is sociotechnical congruence. The intensity of coordination required among teams varies substantially, driven not only the degree of module coupling, but also by factors such as architectural change and nonfunctional requirements. On the other hand, geographic distribution, domain expertise, cultural and language barriers, and many other factors impact teams' ability to coordinate their technical decisions. Congruence is achieved when coordination capabilities match or exceed coordination required.

The STC workshop will share approaches and results, fostering a research community spanning areas as diverse as software architecture and organizational behavior. An interdisciplinary approach is required in order to develop and validate theories that explain the complex and dynamic interactions between organizations and software.

AST 2008
Third Workshop on Automation of Software Test
Sunday, 11 May 2008 (full day), Salon Schiller, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Hong Zhu, Oxford Brookes University, UK
W. Eric Wong, University of Texas at Dallas, USA
Fevzi Belli, University of Paderborn, Germany

Software testing is indispensable for all software development. It is imperative to reduce the cost and improve the effectiveness of software testing by automating the testing process. In the past decades, a great amount of research effort has been spent on automatic test case generation, automatic test oracles, etc. and there is a rapid growth of practices in using automated software testing tools. The workshop is the third in a series held at ICSE conferences. It aims at bridging the gap between theory and practice in order to improve the current state of practice and to foster innovative research in the area. The topics of the workshop cover both theories and practice of software test automation including, but not limited to, automation in the context of various software development methodologies, the techniques, methods, tools and environments of software test automation, and the experiments, empirical studies, experience reports and vision of the future. This year the workshop will have a special theme on model-based software testing. Papers on this topic are particularly welcome.

IWMSE 2008
International Workshop on Multicore Software Engineering
Sunday, 11 May 2008 (full day), Salon Mendelssohn, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Walter F. Tichy, University of Karlsruhe, Germany
Victor Pankratius, University of Karlsruhe, Germany

With the emergence of multicore computers, software engineers face the challenge of parallelizing performance-critical applications of all sorts. Compared to sequential applications, our repertoire of tools and methods for cost-effectively developing reliable, parallel applications is spotty. The purpose of this workshop is to bring together researchers and practitioners with diverse backgrounds in order to advance the state of the art in software engineering for multi/many core parallel applications.

LMSA 2008
Leadership and Management in Software Architecture
Sunday, 11 May 2008 (full day), Salon Wagner, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Brian Berenbach, Siemens Corporate Research, USA
Len Bass, Software Engineering Institute, USA

Software architecture, in education and practice, is primarily concerned with technical issues associated with the quality of software architecture and design. However, as project size increases, leadership and management skills of the architect become more important, to the point where the leadership ability of the project architect can "make or break" a project. This workshop is intended to focus on one often neglected topic of architecture: leadership. Position and full papers are solicited on leadership and management skills of the software architect. Both experience and research papers are welcome.

Topics include but are not limited to: best practices, lessons learned; research in leadership and management; software Team dynamics; effective management of large teams; crisis management; human factors in risk assessment. This is an ideal forum for architects, project managers, and other software professionals to exchange ideas and experiences in leadership and technical management.

ROA 2008
The Role of Abstraction in Software Engineering
Sunday, 11 May 2008 (full day), Salon Potsdam, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Orit Hazzan, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
Jeff Kramer, Imperial College, UK

Why is it that some software engineers are able to produce clear, elegant designs and programs, while others cannot? One hypothesis is that the answer lies in abstraction: the ability to perform abstract thinking and to exhibit abstraction skills. To answer this and other related questions, this one-day workshop focuses on the concept of abstraction in software engineering at the individual, team and organization level, from cognitive, managerial and organizational perspectives. The aim of the workshop is to explore the role of abstraction in dealing with complexity in software engineering process, to discuss how the use of different levels of abstraction may facilitate performance of different software engineering related activities, and to examine whether or not abstraction skills can be taught and earned. The workshop consists of theory- and practice-based presentations, group work and discussions. Workshop activities include: experience sharing with respect to case studies in which abstraction plays a central role, examination of different software engineering topics from the perspective of abstraction, exploration of how abstraction may foster organizational processes, and teaching abstraction in software organizations and in the academia.

SDSOA 2008
Second International Workshop on Systems Development in SOA Environments
Sunday, 11 May 2008 (full day), Salon Meissen, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Kostas Kontogiannis, University of Waterloo, Canada and National Technical University of Athens, Greece
Grace Lewis, Software Engineering Institute, USA
Marin Litoiu, IBM Corporation, Canada
Dennis Smith, Software Engineering Institute, USA

Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is having a substantial impact on the way software systems are developed. Although significant progress is being made in several fronts, there are not a set of clear, central themes to focus research activity. As a result, there is a danger that important research needs will be overlooked, while other efforts will focus on issues of peripheral long-term significance in practice. This workshop will refine the SOA Research Agenda that was developed by SEI and an international team in 2007 and it will follow-up on the First SDSOA workshop held at ICSE 2007. Papers will be presented that address topics of the research agenda. Through an interactive workshop format, researchers will collaboratively identify open research issues and continue identifying and addressing SOA research issues of interest to the community.

SEAMS 2008
Software Engineering for Adaptive and Self-Managing Systems
Monday, 12 May 2008 (full day), Ballroom B, The Westin Leipzig
and Tuesday, 13 May 2008 (full day)
Organizers:
Betty Cheng, Michigan State University, USA
Rogerio de Lemos, University of Kent, UK
David Garlan, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Holger Giese, Hasso Plattner Institut, Germany
Marin Litoiu, IBM Toronto Lab, Canada
Jeff Magee, Imperial College, UK
Hausi Müller, University of Victoria, Canada
Richard Taylor, University of California, Irvine, USA

An increasingly important requirement for software-intensive systems is the ability to self-manage by adapting at run time to handle such things as resource variability, changing user needs, and system intrusions or faults. Such a system must configure and reconfigure itself, continually tune and optimize itself, protect and recover itself, while keeping its complexity hidden from the user. The topic of selfadaptive and self-managing systems has been studied in a large number of specific application areas, including autonomic computing, robotics, control systems, programming languages, software architectures, fault-tolerant computing, and biological computing. The goal of this symposium is to bring together researchers and practitioners from many of these diverse areas to discuss the fundamental principles, state of the art, and critical challenges of self-adaptive and self-managing systems. Specifically, we intend to focus on the software engineering aspects, including the methods, architectures, algorithms, techniques and tools that can be used to support dynamic adaptive and self-managing behavior.

PROMISE 2008
Fourth International Workshop on Predictor Models in SE
Monday, 12 May 2008 (full day), Ballroom C, The Westin Leipzig
and Tuesday, 13 May 2008 (full day)
Organizers:
Gary D. Boetticher, University of Houston - Clear Lake, USA
Tim Menzies, West Virginia University, USA
Tom Ostrand, AT&T Labs-Research, USA
Guenther Ruhe, University of Calgary, Canada

The PROMISE workshops are about repeatable experiments that can provide information to aid the construction of reliable, safe, and cost-effective software systems. Software engineering is a decision intensive discipline. We seek to build models that accurately reveal hidden patterns regarding software resource management, the development processes, or the software artifacts, and that can be used with minimal supervision. Do the models lead to better decisions? How can models be validated? Is the model creation process repeatable? Are there better, faster, cheaper ways to build models? How effective are these models for identifying causal relations? The PROMISE workshop seeks to address these questions and others, and to deliver to the software engineering community useful, usable, verifiable models, and public datasets for building and evaluating new models. One of the goals of PROMISE is to collect data for repeatable software engineering experiments. The current PROMISE repository has 44 data sets and a mean growth rate of 44% more data sets each year over the last 3.5 years.

SDG 2008
Software Development Governance
Monday, 12 May 2008 (full day), Salon Mendelssohn, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Dubinsky Yael, Computer Science Department, Technion, Israel
Sunita Chulani, IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center, USA
Philippe Kruchten, University of British Columbia, Canada

Software continues to grow in importance across all aspects of modern life. As a result, enterprises are seeking stronger alignment between their goals, the strategies they use to achieve these goals, and their software development organizations. At the heart of this alignment is the desire for a clear understanding of the value that software development projects provide, as well as the risks they carry. The field that addresses these concerns is known as software development governance.

This one-day workshop focuses on the challenges associated with software development governance. It will provide a forum to share existing research, brainstorm, and help chart future research directions for governance in software development organizations. We will explore governance issues from a variety of perspectives, including the use of technology and tools for governance automation, exploiting techniques from finance and business to govern software development, and how sociological issues affect software development governance

EA 2008
Early Aspects at ICSE: Aspect-Oriented Requirements Engineering and Architecture Design
Monday, 12 May 2008 (full day), Salon Potsdam, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Monica Pinto, Spain
Ruzanna Chitchyan, UK
Awais Rashid, UK
Joao Araujo, Portugal
Elisa Baniassad, Hong-Kong
Paul Clements, USA
Ana Moreira, Portugal
Bedir Tekinerdogan, The Netherlands

Early aspects are crosscutting concerns that exist in requirements analysis, domain analysis and architecture design activities of software lifecycle. Work on early aspects focuses on systematically identifying, modularizing, and analyzing such crosscutting concerns and their impact at these early phases of the software development. One very promising application of early aspects is in the capture and representation of variability across a product family, as was shown in the previous EASPLC'05 workshop. This second workshop on the application of aspects throughout the life cycle to product line development will build on the success of the EA-SPLC'05 and series of other EA workshops. The general aim of this workshop is to facilitate cross-fertilization of ideas in product line practice, requirements engineering, domain engineering, software architecture design, and aspect-oriented software development in order to identify the problems and potential solutions and continue the maturation of Early Aspects as a discipline. The specific aim of this workshop is to stimulate integration of the work on early development activities for product lines with the work for Early Aspects.

GraMoT 2008
Graph and Model Transformation
Monday, 12 May 2008 (full day), Blauer Salon, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Gabor Karsai, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, USA
Gabriele Taentzer, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Germany

Graphs are very high-level and general models that have been used in various fields of computer science. They are well-suited to describe complex structures, especially the underlying structure of visual models, due to their multidimensional extension. Graphs can be manipulated by graph transformation utilizing rewriting rules. Considering current trends in software engineering such as model-driven development, there is an emerging need to describe model transformations and other operations on models in a precise way. Recent research has shown that graph transformation is a promising formalism to specify model transformations. The goal of the workshop is to foster interaction between the graph transformation and the model transformation community to facilitate exchange of results and challenge problems. The graph transformation community has built up a significant body of knowledge over the past 30 years. The research area of model transformations has recently been identified as a key subject in model-driven development. The workshop aims at the intellectual interchange of ideas, problems, and solutions that will lead to major advances in both fields.

WEUSE IV
Fourth Workshop on End-User Software Engineering
Monday, 12 May 2008 (full day), Ballroom A, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Robin Abraham, Microsoft Corporation, USA
Margaret Burnett, Oregon State University, USA
Mary Shaw, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

End-user programmers far outnumber professional programmers, and are using a wide range of programming languages and environments to create software. Unfortunately, evidence suggests that there is a high incidence of errors in applications developed by end users for a wide variety of purposes. Some of these errors have a high impact on individuals and organizations. This aspect has motivated researchers to explore new ways in which to help end users develop dependable software. Approaches and tools traditionally developed for professional programmers cannot be brought directly to end users primarily because end users have different background, training, and motivations than professional programmers. Therefore, current research in the area of end-user software engineering involves specialists in software engineering, programming languages, human-computer interaction, empirical studies, education, and cognitive psychology.
The Fourth Workshop on End-User Software Engineering is a one-day workshop which will focus on the challenges faced by researchers working on helping end users create dependable software. The primary goal of the workshop is to bring together researchers working in this research space. Brief presentations will kick off the various sessions of the workshop. The rest of the time will be devoted to group discussions. The overall structure of the workshop will be flexible, including at least one open session aimed at fostering research collaborations.

BIPI 2008
Business Impact of Process Improvements
Tuesday, 13 May 2008 (full day), Salon Potsdam, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Frances Paulisch, Siemens, Germany
Christof Ebert, Vector Consulting Services, Germany

The topic of this workshop is achieving tangible and sustainable business impact from process improvements. Focus is on approaches that are both practical and quantifiable. The kinds of process improvements addressed include, but are not limited to, the introduction of iterative, agile or "lean" approaches, improved requirements engineering, risk management, usage of process improvement reference frameworks, and improved quality control and assurance. The business impact should be illustrated through either increasing the value of what is delivered to the customer or reducing the cost (for example by reduction of rework effort). The audience will both share experiences how to reliably set-up, measure and achieve business-oriented process improvements in order to increase return on investment in software engineering.

SHARK 2008
SHAring and Reusing Architectural Knowledge
Tuesday, 13 May 2008 (full day), Salon Mendelssohn, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Paris Avgeriou, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Patricia Lago, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Philippe Kruchten, University of British Columbia, Canada

Part or most of software systems is provided through COTS components, outsourcing, open source, multiparty collaboration and distributed development teams. Software architecture plays an increasingly important role to manage the complex interactions and dependencies between the stakeholders and to provide a central artifact that can be used for reference by them. Existing notational and documentation approaches to software architecture typically focus on the components and connectors and fail to document the design decisions that resulted in the architecture as well as the organizational, process and business rationale underlying the design decisions. This results in high maintenance cost, high degrees of design erosion and lack of information and documentation of relevant architectural knowledge.

This workshop focuses on current approaches, tackling this problem: methods, languages, notations, tools to extract, represent, share, use and re-use architectural knowledge. Architectural Knowledge (AK) is defined as the integrated representation of the software architecture of a software-intensive system (or a family of systems), the architectural design decisions, and the external context/environment.

CHASE 2008
Human and Cooperative Aspects of Software Engineering
Tuesday, 13 May 2008 (full day), Ballroom A, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Li-Te Cheng, IBM, USA
Cleidson de Souza, UFPA, Brazil
Yvonne Dittrich, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Michael John, Fraunhofer, Germany,
Orit Hazzan, Technion, Israel
Frank Maurer, University of Calgary, Canada
Helen Sharp, Open University, UK
Janice Singer, NRC, Canada
Susan Elliot Sim, University of California, Irvine, USA
Jonathan Sillito, University of Calgary, Canada
Margaret-Anne Storey, University of Victoria, Canada
Bjørnar Tessem, University of Bergen, Norway
Gina Venolia, Microsoft Research, USA

Software is created by people - software engineers working in varied environments under various conditions. Thus understanding the human and cooperative aspects of software development is crucial to understanding how methods and tools are used, and thereby improving the creation, evolution and maintenance of software. This has once again been emphasized by the retrospective on Peopleware's 20th anniversary at ICSE 2007. Recently, a renaissance is occurring in this research area, with a large amount of research being published in software engineering venues as well as other research discourses. (See e.g. a special issue on Qualitative Software Engineering Research for Information and Software Technology - June 2007). Thus the time is ripe to bring together researchers to share knowledge, and further build the research area. The goal of this workshop is therefore to provide a forum for discussing high quality research on the human and cooperative aspects of software engineering, as well as a meeting place for the nascent community that is currently distributed over several research domains (e.g. HCI, SE, CSCW, and IS).

SECSE 2008
First International Workshop on Software Engineering for Computational Science and Engineering
Tuesday, 13 May 2008 (full day), Boardroom 803, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Jeffrey Carver, Mississippi State University, USA
Steven Easterbrook, University of Toronto, Canada
Jeremy Kepner, Lincoln Laboratory, USA
Bernd Mohr, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Germany
Lorin Hochstein, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
Judith Segal, The Open University, United Kingdom

Computational Science and Engineering software supports a wide variety of domains including nuclear physics, crash simulation, satellite data processing, fluid dynamics, climate modeling, bioinformatics, and financial modeling. The recent increase in the importance of this type of software motivates the need to better understand its development process. This movement creates an opportunity for the software engineering community to apply our techniques and knowledge to a new and important application domain. Furthermore, the design, implementation, and maintenance of CS&E software systems can be significantly different from the systems and development processes more typically studied by the software engineering community. This workshop brings together researchers from the software engineering community with researchers and practitioners from the CS&E application community. The workshop allows participants to share perspectives and present findings from research and practice that are relevant to the CS&E application development. A significant portion of the workshop is devoted to discussion of the position papers with the goal of generating a research agenda to improve tools, techniques, and experimental methods for CS&E software engineering in the future.

SESS 2008
Fourth International Workshop on Software Engineering for Secure Systems
Saturday, 17 May 2008 (full day), Salon Wittenberg, The Westin Leipzig
and Sunday, 18 May 2008 (full day)
Organizers:
Bart De Win, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium
Seok-Won Lee, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA
Mattia Monga, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Italy

The 4th edition of the SESS workshop aims at providing a venue for software engineers and security researchers to exchange ideas and techniques. In fact, software is at core of most of the business transactions and its smart integration in an industrial setting may be the competitive advantage even when the core competence is outside the ICT field. As a result, the revenues of a firm depend directly on several complex software-based systems. Thus, stakeholders and users should be able to trust these systems to provide data and elaborations with a degree of confidentiality, integrity, and availability compatible with their needs. Moreover, the pervasiveness of software products in the creation of critical infrastructures has raised the value of trustworthiness and new efforts should be dedicated to achieve it. However, nowadays almost every application has some kind of security requirement even if its use is not to be considered critical.

CVSM 2008
Comparison and Versioning of Software Models
Saturday, 17 May 2008 (full day), Salon Meissen, The Westin Leipzig
Organizers:
Jürgen Ebert, University of Koblenz Landau, Germany
Udo Kelter, University of Siegen, Germany
Tarja Systä, Tampere University of Technology, Finland

With model driven approaches to software development graphical documents (e.g. models in UML notation) have become vital artefacts in software engineering. Conventional techniques for document comparison, document retrieval, and document reuse, which have been developed in the context of version and configuration management systems, are primarily aimed at textual documents. They are not directly applicable to graphical documents like UML diagrams. The aim of this workshop is the establishment of the state of the art in the area of comparing and versioning of models. The most relevant research questions shall be identified, an overview on applications shall be collected, and the research community in this area shall be brought together.

 

 

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